Clay Indigo

Taxonomy
Scientific Name
Indigofera psoraloides (L.) L.
Higher Classification
Dicotyledons
Family
FABACEAE
Synonyms
Cytisus psoraloides L., Indigofera complanata Spreng., Indigofera nitida T.M.Salter, Indigofera racemosa L., Indigofera trifoliata L.
Common Names
Clay Indigo (e)
National Status
Status and Criteria
Endangered A2c
Assessment Date
2012/12/18
Assessor(s)
D. Raimondo, N.A. Helme, R. Koopman & L. von Staden
Justification
A population reduction of between 70 and 80% is estimated based on at least 83% habitat loss to urban and agricultural expansion over three generations of this long-lived resprouter. Remaining subpopulations occur on small, isolated fragments and continue to decline due to ongoing habitat loss and degradation.
Distribution
Endemism
South African endemic
Provincial distribution
Western Cape
Range
Tulbagh to the Cape Peninsula and Gordon's Bay.
Habitat and Ecology
Major system
Terrestrial
Major habitats
Cape Flats Dune Strandveld, Swartland Shale Renosterveld, Peninsula Shale Renosterveld, Swartland Granite Renosterveld, Cape Winelands Shale Fynbos, Peninsula Granite Fynbos, Boland Granite Fynbos, Lourensford Alluvium Fynbos, Swartland Alluvium Fynbos
Description
Lowland granite and shale renosterveld, with some records from sandy fynbos.
Threats
Around 80% of this species' habitat has already been transformed, predominantly due to urban expansion on the Cape Peninsula, between Paarl and Wellington, and around Malmesbury and Saldanha. Agricultural expansion, particularly vineyards and wheat, has caused further extensive loss around Stellenbosch, and on the lowland flats between Durbanville, Paarl and Stellenbosch. Habitat loss continues, particularly to urban expansion in the Durbanville and Gordon's Bay areas, and a number of remaining subpopulations are also threatened by competition from alien invasive plants.
Population

A population reduction of between 70 and 80% is estimated based on 83% habitat loss within three generations of this long-lived resprouter, with an estimated generation length of 50 years. Between 10 and 20 remaining subpopulations occur predominantly on small, isolated fragments and continue to decline due to ongoing habitat loss and degradation.


Population trend
Decreasing
Assessment History
Taxon assessed
Status and Criteria
Citation/Red List version
Indigofera psoraloides (L.) L.VU A2c; B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)2012.1
Indigofera psoraloides (L.) L.VU A2c; B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)Raimondo et al. (2009)
Bibliography

Goldblatt, P. and Manning, J.C. 2000. Cape Plants: A conspectus of the Cape Flora of South Africa. Strelitzia 9. National Botanical Institute, Cape Town.


Manning, J.C. and Goldblatt, P. 2012. Plants of the Greater Cape Floristic Region 1: The Core Cape Flora. Strelitzia 29. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria.


Raimondo, D., von Staden, L., Foden, W., Victor, J.E., Helme, N.A., Turner, R.C., Kamundi, D.A. and Manyama, P.A. 2009. Red List of South African Plants. Strelitzia 25. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria.


Citation
Raimondo, D., Helme, N.A., Koopman, R. & von Staden, L. 2012. Indigofera psoraloides (L.) L. National Assessment: Red List of South African Plants version 2020.1. Accessed on 2022/05/18

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Distribution map

© N.A. Helme


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